Tuesday, 1 November 2011

Haute Couture Coupled With Haute Cuisine In Berlin

A model wears a dress made of seaweed and octopus created by Roland Trettl at the exhibition opening at Berlin's Communication Museum, which is presenting around 50 photographs created by Trettl and photographer Helge Kirchberger showing models wearing edible haute couture.

Move over Lady Gaga and your meat dress. A Berlin museum is coupling haute couture with haute cuisine, spotlighting models draped in octopus tunics, seaweed miniskirts and chocolate dresses. 

The creations by Michelin-starred Austrian chef Roland Trettl, captured in around 50 sumptuous stills by his compatriot photographer Helge Kirchberger, blur the lines of sensual pleasure in a feast for the eyes and the palate.

The Fashion Food exhibition at the Communication Museum in the German capital to January 29 dissects "taste" and flamboyant fashion statements, as well as notions of consumerism and sustainability in a rich society.

"The images are not salacious or pornographic but they are erotic and provocative and raise questions," museum director Lieselotte Kugler told AFP, following an exhibition opening with two live models.

"This is also a celebration of food. When you think of all the food that is thrown away every year in Germany -- including 5,000 tonnes of bread -- everyone needs to consider how they approach food and how food is increasingly industrialised in our society."

While US pop provocateur Lady Gaga raised eyebrows at an awards show last year with a dress made entirely of raw beef, many of the confections here could add up to a balanced diet.
 
A model wears a creation made of pasta and quail eggs by Michelin-starred chef Roland Trettl. The Fashion Food exhibition dissects "taste" and flamboyant fashion statements, as well as notions of consumerism and sustainability in a rich society.

Food designer Roland Trettl places a fish skin mask on a model at the opening of the Fashion Food exhibition. The exhibition marks the first major presentation of Trettl and Helge Kirchberger's work to a broader audience.

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